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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please recommand me a rifle reloading press.

want to reload: 303 (Enfiled No.4), 7.62x54r (M44), 7.62x39 (TC contender). Quantity will be very low, maybe 20rd per month per caliber, if that.

Prefer to have quick die/caliber change over feature, and low maintnence (for example, doesn't require messy lube. Does that mean carbine die?).


I have read some articles about reloading and it seems that single stage is the way to go, rock-chucker maybe? or Lee Classic cast? any pro/cons? is RCBS turret press much more convenient?

Thanks
 

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LEE turret Press deluxe or a Lyman T Mag 2 turret Press will do you a very good job I have used both of them for over 30 years and still loading all the time. The Lee is cheeper but as good == GOOD LUCK ==
 

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Dillon 550 is the best!!!!
ok I just said that because I am selling one.
I like my Hornady LNL AP press much better especially when price is considered.
For a single stage press it is hard to best the RCBS Rockchucker
 

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Dillon 550 is the best!!!!
ok I just said that because I am selling one.
I like my Hornady LNL AP press much better especially when price is considered.
For a single stage press it is hard to best the RCBS Rockchucker
I thank the dillon is over priced on about every thing. Jest whit I thank.
 

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RCBS Rock Chucker is great. Hornady makes almost the same press. Lee is ok but you get what you pay for. My RCBS has been in service 25 year. I also have the Piggyback Press for it.
 

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They're all good, just depends on what you plan to do. With the minimal amount of loading you plan on doing any single stage will be fine. I have two RCBS single stage and an RCBS Turret press. I wouldn't trade my turret for anything, but if I had to do it again I would get the Redding.

You will need a lot more than just a press. Might want to look into one of the many kits available. For the $$ the Lee Anniversary is hard to beat, cept there scale sucks. The RCBS Rockchucker Kit is a good one and will last you a lifetime. Or, you can get a good manual, read it a few times and get to know what you will need, what you will want and what you will spend, then purchase all the goodies one at a time, piece by piece.
 

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I thank the dillon is over priced on about every thing. Jest whit I thank.
You never have to buy repair parts!
I like the Hornady for the fact that the Projector press is a way simplier perss than the 650 and less expensive too.
Any one that brags on Dillon's customer service has never called Hornady.
Hornady can also give you load data
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
for some reason I already have a RCBS 510 scale and a kinetic hammer....

so, amongs the rock-chucker, Lee breech-lock, Redding boss, and hornady LNL, which one has quick change-over capability? which one has the most steady linkage? they all use universal dies, no?

which powder measurement system (the quick dispenser thingey) is good? is the one included in Lee anniversary kit ok?
 

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The quick change bushings can be used on any press with the standard 1 1/4-12 threads. That would include RCBS, Redding, Hornady and Lee.
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=858110

which powder measurement system (the quick dispenser thingey) is good? is the one included in Lee anniversary kit ok?
No, not really, it works, but being made of cheap plastic throughout it has it's problems. All the others, Hornady, RCBS, Redding, Lyman all will do the job.

which one has the most steady linkage?
That would be Redding or better yet ($$$) Forster.
 

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Get a good digital scale. The balance type scales leave too much fudge factor for precision reloads. Once you use one you will see the difference.
RCBS has good customer service. They even replace all the small stuff that I loose. I don't think I have ever paid for a part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks guys.

I got it narrowed down to the bigboss or bigboss II. Other than different linkage, what are the differences? there seems to be some complaints about BB II's priming system.

Please recommand good case trimmer, neck turner, and powder dispenser. I won't reload alot, so I want the reloading process to be as hassle-free as possible. especially the powder dispenser, want it to be as consistant as possible.

does Forster have quick-swap capability?
 

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there seems to be some complaints about BB II's priming system.
Do yourself a favor and forget priming on the press, any press. Get a hand priming tool. I have a Lee and RCBS, I don't use the Lee much.

does Forster have quick-swap capability?
Yes, go here and read up on this unique system.
http://www.forsterproducts.com/store.asp?pid=24822&catid=19938

Please recommand good case trimmer, neck turner, and powder dispenser.
Depends on your budget.

All the basic trimmers will work just fine. If you want extra precision you can go big $$ and get the Redding 2400 Match. Redding trimmers are unique in that they spin the case to a stationary cutter whereas the others spin the cutter to the case. In theory spinning the case will result in a more uniform (square) case mouth.

Skip the neck turning, it is not something that is at all necessary and will only clutter up your bench. If later in your loading career you feel the need to experiment with neck turning, give it a whirl, for now forget it.

Are you looking for a manual powder measure or and electronic dispenser? I have two powder measures and one electronic dispenser. My RCBS Uniflow powder measure works well. I also have a Harrells Precision pistol powder measure. This is accurate to within .05gr and is great for pistols and small rifles, but it is expensive. I have a Lyman 1200 Dispenser that I use all the time when working up rifle loads. It the cat' ass and I would not give it up for anything. That said, it really is at it's best when working up loads. Once I have "the load" I set up one of my measures and just throw my charges.
As with all powder measures, the type of powder has a lot to do with how accurate they are. Fine ball powders will always meter (measure) better than large extruded (Rat-Turd) powders.
 

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With the Lee Classic turret press you can buy replacement die holders so you can leave your dies set up and just lift out the holder with the dies remaining in it, makes changing calibers easy.
 

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With the Lee Classic turret press you can buy replacement die holders so you can leave your dies set up and just lift out the holder with the dies remaining in it, makes changing calibers easy.
Yup, love my turret press. Never have to change a die.

 

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People that advise turrets generally fall into 1 of 2 catagories
A) those that would be better served by a full progressive
B) those that find "install sizing die and size all the brass, install seating die and seat all the bullets" to be a overwelming mental chalange.

Turrets HAD a place in the press lineup, back in the 50's-70's (when your only choice of a progressive was a single caliber Star loader), but since the advent of reasonably priced "convertable" progressives they are no longer a viable compromise.

The "quick change" bushings are another such waste of time/resorces, as again you have to purchase a full set of bushings for each die set.

Buy yourself a used Rockchucker, or other single stage press, and go from there. No matter which way you go, you still need to learn how to set up your dies properly (note that it takes me less than 5 minutes to completly set up a new set of dies, and less than 30 seconds to change them out once the lock ring is secured.
 

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People that advise turrets generally fall into 1 of 2 catagories
A) those that would be better served by a full progressive
B) those that find "install sizing die and size all the brass, install seating die and seat all the bullets" to be a overwelming mental chalange.

Turrets HAD a place in the press lineup, back in the 50's-70's (when your only choice of a progressive was a single caliber Star loader), but since the advent of reasonably priced "convertable" progressives they are no longer a viable compromise.

The "quick change" bushings are another such waste of time/resorces, as again you have to purchase a full set of bushings for each die set.

Buy yourself a used Rockchucker, or other single stage press, and go from there. No matter which way you go, you still need to learn how to set up your dies properly (note that it takes me less than 5 minutes to completly set up a new set of dies, and less than 30 seconds to change them out once the lock ring is secured.
You have no idea what the hell you are talking about. Because I choose to use my Turret press over one my single stage presses I am some how mentally challenged? Setting up both seating and sizing dies require the same amount of mental/physical capacity whether it is a single stage, Turret or progressive. Because I use a turret press you assume I size, prime, charge, seat and crimp each round individually in some sort of makeshift progressive system. Well, you are completely wrong and way off base. You obviously have no idea as to what the benefits are of a turret press and I do not mean load progressive.

Speaking of "overwhelming mental challenges", you may what to download some type of spell checker for your computer, cuz yur spellin ain't no goode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
come on guys, calm down, this is an "advise for the noob" thread, no need to get super serious...:lol:

I will go for a Forster press since it is the only top-lever model and doesn't require a super rigid bench.

powder measure: I will need something that can do 20~ 90 gr with good consistancy, which one is the best? need to stay under $150 though.

priming tool: what is the difference between the RCBS handpriming tool and the RCBS universal-handpriming? any other recommandations?
 

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Prefer to have quick die/caliber change over feature, and low maintnence (for example, doesn't require messy lube. Does that mean carbine die?).
I missed this on your first post. Looks like you plan to load strictly for rifle ammo. Sorry, but you will have to lube all of your bottle necked rifle rounds if you are going to Full Length size them. Dillion makes a "Carbide" 223 die, but it is designed for the high volume loader and still requires lube. No way around it. You will also have to use lube if you plan on "Neck" sizing only with standard neck dies. There is only one "neck" sizing die on the market that requires no lube and that is the Lee Collet die. Excellent die, works better than any other Neck die on the market.

powder measure: I will need something that can do 20~ 90 gr with good consistancy, which one is the best? need to stay under $150 though.
This will work.
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=466608

priming tool: what is the difference between the RCBS handpriming tool and the RCBS universal-handpriming? any other recommandations?
The Universal Hand Priming tool features a convenient universal shellholder that accepts virtually any case from 32 ACP to 45-70 Government, eliminating the hassle and expense of using shellholders. Also features a patented safety gate that isolates the primer seating operation from the primer supply virtually eliminating the possibility of tray detonation. The removable primer tray correctly positions the primers for use and will fit any manufacturers' primer packaging. For use with large and small rifle or handgun primers. Lifetime warranty from RCBS

The Standard model requires the use of individual shell holders. These are the same shell holders that are used for the dies/press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Thanks.

so far the decisions are:
*Forster press (top-lever, low bending pressure on bench). $230
*Redding 3 or 3BR powder measure (consistancy, and repeatablity from numbered micrometer settings). $150
*RCBS universal hand prime tool (no need for shell holder, makes sense to match with the Forster which also doesn't need shell holder). $50
*RCBS 510 scale (already have it, so...)


now the case trimmer: (warning: very noob questions)
how do you adjust a case trimmer? the Redding 2400 has a micrometer on the blade so I can see how it is done, how about the <$100 trimmers? How is the case held in the trimmer, is it some kind of one-fits-all thing or I need to get caliber specific holder?

also the full-length sizing vs neck sizing: I heard that neck sized loads are more accurate (preserves the fireformed shape), but a neck-sized round might have problem in some guns, so full length sizing is necessary for semi-auto, is that right? For my bolt or single-shot needs, I supposed neck-sizing is the way to go?
 

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Neck sizing may be more accurate and it may not. Either way at some point you will have to FL size your brass. The brass continues to grow after each firing and sooner or later it will be to long/fat to chamber. You will need an FL die or a Body die for this. I personally have not found Neck Sizing only to be more accurate than my FL sizing with a .001-.002 shoulder bump.

Yes, you a re correct, the semi-auto requires FL sizing each and every time. It also requires a good shoulder bump, failure to do so can cause all sorts of problems from a simple jam to a slamfire. Proper die set-up is critical for the semi-auto.

Go here and check out this picture.
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=614276
The left side of the trimmer has a universal collet type holder that is tightened down on the case head with the "T" handle. The right side is the cutter and shaft. It slides back and forth, the amount of travel is adjusted by the round lock ring you can see between the trimmer body and the cranking handle.

This one is very similar with rough adjustments on the left shaft and micro adjustments are made on the right/crank side. The case is held with a similar collet, Hornady calls theirs a "Cam Lock".
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=315831
 
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