Perfect Union banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Serpent mounds, hilltop enclosures, geometric earthworks and giant burial mounds makes for a great day of adventure. Here is a post of 27 of Ohio's biggest burial mounds. Many photographed for the first time.
I'll post pic of the enclosures ect, at a later date, but for now I hope you enjoy a part of American hisory that before now was "address restricted" Not Anymore.
"restricted" was meant for you, by the way.

thenephilimchrgoogleonicles.blogspot.com/2011/08/tour-of-ohios-largest-burial-mounds.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Hey Moundbuilder;

I can't get the link to open, but my word! you've certainly created a lavish of interest in me.

I spend a great deal of time with history. I'm a avid researcher of historic iron furnaces (have located and researched over 50 of them in 8 states) and their associated stacks and so forth (by the way, Ohio has a rich iron plantation history as well). I live in an area chockful of mounds and other works. My plan for retirement is to spend the most of my time in researching these things (along with the Civil War stuff), and visiting everything of historical value I can locate.

Last summer, I visited Kahokia Mound near East Saint Louis, and was absolutely fascinated, not only by the size of the biggest (14 acres and doggoned tall) mound, but of the large number of mounds in the vicinity.

I'd enjoy hearing more about these things from you. And, I'll copy that link, place it in the address line, and see if I can bring the photos up.

Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Wolfspotter;

The photos were awesome. I guess I'll be heading up north one of these days, especially to see the Tahawas mine and village. I may be wrong, but from the photo, the Tahawas stack may well be the largest I've seen (a photo of).

The Airdrie furnace stack at Paradise Kentucky, mentioned in the John Prine song, "Daddy won't you take me back to Muhlenberg Country, down by the Green River where Paradise lay...I'm sorry my son, but you're too late in asking. Mr. Peabody's coal train done hauled it away" was built against a 40 foot tall limestone bluff, and yet even then extended to a total of 65 feet high.

Instead of covered with the usual limestone pyramidal covering or shell, it was covered with 2 foot wide swatches of metal, riveted together like old iron ships, every two inches. The stack and metal remain, as well as the bosch, which makes it clear, that even though 4 or 5 attempts to make iron were mounted, using the local coal deposits as fuel, internal temps never reached high enough to reduce the iron ore/limestone fluxing agent/coal, to anything approaching usable or saleable iron.

I suspect 'retirement' for me, will be traveling from historic iron furnace site to historic iron furnace site, surveying them, documenting them, and writing about them...and let me tell you, I'm looking forward to it!

Again, thanks for the photos. I wish I could find and post a bunch of mine, but I'm ignorant about the process and just a tad lazy to boot.

Later!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top