Ruger 10/22 Anything about the Ruger 10/22 family of rifles.

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Old 08-30-2007, 10:10   #1
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Custom receiver options for 10/22's

I've kept researching this, as I'm leading up to putting something together from scratch. Thought I'd share my findings here.

Currently, it looks like the best options for a custom 10/22 receiver are as follows:

1. Ruger factory receivers. You can get a new Ruger receiver for $75 to $80 at Shooters Discount. Much cheaper than buying a brand new 10/22, only to discard the stock, trigger, and other parts. Any disadvantages? They seem to be constantly sold out of these (big surprise!), plus these don't have some of the feature options that the others below have.

2. MOA receiver. This looks to be perhaps the most deluxe, heavy duty receiver out there, it's made of steel where most are aluminum. Haven't found the cost yet, but it requires threading your barrel into the receiver. Plus it has an extra lug on the rear (which the factory ones do NOT have, nor do any other of the aftermarket ones), which you can use to really firmly bed this thing into your stock. This definitely looks like the most solid option out there. And affordable: $180 at Brownells.

3. Xring receiver by Tactical Solutions. These still aren't available, but supposedly will be later this Fall. I found them on the Mizzoula Mule site.

4. Volquartsen. These are interesting; they have both a heavy duty stainless steel one, and a superlite aluminum one. Both have the Picatinny rail machined right into the top of the receiver. Nice option, very solid. Like most Volquartsen stuff though, very expensive, $350 for stainless and $359 for black is the best price I've seen for the steel version (superlite aluminum is $240). One interesting unique thing about these is their steel version has a "new tapered cone bushing installation system." This appears to be a way to improve on the factory V-block approach of attaching your barrel to the receiver. The more deluxe approach is threading the barrel into the receiver, but this is a hassle and costs extra. This new receiver gives you a way to get the benefits of a barrel threaded into the receiver, without having to actual go to all the trouble of doing so.

5. Tactical Innovations receivers. The company that makes the top-shelf aluminum mags for 10/22's. They started making these rock-hard aluminum receivers, and they also have the option of a Picatinny rail. They run about the same as the Volquartsen aluminum, around $240. But they look nicer. Unlike the MOA, they don't have the extra lug, but I don't know if that is really necessary, provided that one beds the receiver firmly into the stock. Note that this receiver uses the traditional V-block to attach the barrel. But it does look very sharp.


Bottom line, it appears that the MOA is definitely the most beefy, heavy-duty option out there. But it looks like it'll take some extra hassle to install. The Volquartsen steel option looks perhaps the most interesting to me, as it has that new barrel attachment system that I'd like to try, to give me a firmer and more consistent barrel connection with less cant. But wow are they expensive!

If one is going to go with a traditional aluminum receiver, I can't really see much advantage of using anything other than the Ruger factory receiver, they're well proven, and are 1/3 the price. The cool machined-in Picatinny rails on the aftermarket aluminum ones are cool, but not worth $150 extra in my book.



Last edited by timlt; 08-30-2007 at 10:22.
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Old 08-30-2007, 11:35   #2
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Just had a fascinating discussion with the guy at the MOA receiver company. If you look carefully at the pictures in the link I provided above to the MOA receiver, you can see the screw hole for the lug on the rear of the receiver.

He explained to me how this works. When you install the receiver in a stock, you have to use a special fixture to drill a hole at a 12 degree angle for that rear lug. You put an escutcheon in there after drilling, and then you use a screw to affix the rear lug into the stock. With some aftermarket stocks, there may also be some minimal fitting required.

But here's the bottom line, and the fascinating thing about this receiver. Due to that rear lug, you basically don't need to bed the receiver into the action, it's rock solid in there to begin with. And since the barrel is threaded into a STEEL receiver, you don't have the usual problems of flexing, etc., in a v-block connected barrel as your barrel heats up.

This seems like a really solid way to connect things. The guy told me of numerous 10/22's they set up that had gotten some incredible groups. For instance, with this receiver (and of course, a heavy target barrel) mounted on a long-barreled .22LR revolver, he shot 5 shots into 0.25 inches at 100 yards. With a revolver!!!

Anyway, if these results are even close to being true, this receiver sounds like a really interesting foundation for a custom target 10/22. And really not all that terribly expensive, though of course you have the hassles of getting your barrel threaded, and of either getting the fixture to drill the hole yourself, or having them do it. But if that eliminates the need for bedding, it may be worth it.
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Old 08-30-2007, 18:02   #3
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Originally Posted by timlt View Post
This seems like a really solid way to connect things. The guy told me of numerous 10/22's they set up that had gotten some incredible groups. For instance, with this receiver (and of course, a heavy target barrel) mounted on a long-barreled .22LR revolver, he shot 5 shots into 0.25 inches at 100 yards. With a revolver!!!
I don't understand this. How do you mount a 10/22 receiver and heavy barrel on a "revolver"? Unless the term revolver as used here doesn't mean something like a Smith & Wesson this doesn't make sense. What am I missing?
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Old 08-30-2007, 18:31   #4
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Sorry, I meant "pistol" not revolver. There are heavy-barreled custom semiautomatic pistols out there that can use an action exactly like that used in the 10/22.

For example, the Volquartsen Predator, as here.

https://www.volquartsen.com/vc//page...tems.jsp?id=25
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Old 08-31-2007, 04:46   #5
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Originally Posted by timlt View Post
Sorry, I meant "pistol" not revolver. There are heavy-barreled custom semiautomatic pistols out there that can use an action exactly like that used in the 10/22.

For example, the Volquartsen Predator, as here.

https://www.volquartsen.com/vc//page...tems.jsp?id=25
OK, now I understand. Thanks for the clarification.
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Old 08-31-2007, 15:38   #6
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Keep in mind the MOA guy is gonna talk up his product. It's that salesperson thing. Of course he's gonna say great things about them. I do know they're very good receivers though from reports I've read. I've never read orheard of any reports about the TI ones. Volquartsen...good also. I'm very curious about the forthcoming Tac-Sol ones. I'm thinking I'll use on myself on my next build, maybe over this winter.
Remember, even with those stripped recievers from Shooters Discount, you'l need to pay shipping and a transfer fee so you might still be close to the cost of a whole new one.

Regardless, if you're gonna go with an aftermarket rcvr, you really should be wiling to go all out on everything else too. No sence buying one of the aforementioned rcvrs and then using midlle-of-the-road parts for the rest of the build. Especially with a threaded set-up. Going that extreme you really should be looking at the creme de la creme. Meaning Kidd trigger and and equally top of the lne bbl and action internals. You'd be looking realistically upwards of $1500. If ya gonna step in 1/2 way, jump in with both feet!
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Old 08-31-2007, 17:35   #7
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Of course, one always has to take such comments with a grain of salt. But there are four obvious and undeniable differences between the MOA receivers and the others, even if I ignore everything else the guy told me:

(1) Price (the MOA is much lower)

(2) Materials (the MOA is made out of steel, and Voquartsen is the only other one that is)

(3) Threading (the MOA is the only one where you directly thread the barrel into receiver, making it the strongest option contributing to maintaining an accurate fit between barrel and receiver over the long haul)

(4) Rear lug (only the MOA has the rear lug, which you can use to strongly mount the receiver into a stock, thus making bedding the receiver unnecessary).


Just looking at those advantages of the MOA, as long as you can find a way to get the receiver mounted properly (you have to use a special fixture to drill the lug screw), and to get your barrel threaded for the receiver, this looks like a very solid and useful foundation to build a custom rifle around. Obviously it's not for everybody: the hassles of the custom fitting, and like you said, the costs of getting everything else custom, will probably be prohibitive for many. But if you want to really go to town and put together a gem, this would be one way of doing that.
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