Lever Action Talk Lever Action firearms of all makes

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Old 04-05-2009, 14:02   #1
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Original Henry rifles and or clones

While recently sorting through a few of the different lever rifles in hopes of finding something that was attractive, worth the money, and of reasonable construction, I stumbled onto something that somebody here may be able to help with.
I was looking at some Henry clones made by Uberti. The particular rifle that caught my eye had a wood forestock, and a case hardened reciever. It was chambered in .45 colt.
I'm partial to the longer barrels. I was looking at the rifle and pondering the 1k price tag, when I noticed, that they had added on to the end of the barrel. There was literally about a five inch piece fitted(scabbed) onto the end of the barrel and magazine.
It looked like somebodies answer to a longer barrel, was not to have a longer barrel, but to make one with an add on.

My question is, was this something that Henry did originally, or was this Uberti's answer to a longer barrel?

I think I may have answered my own question. The originals load by rotating the end of the barrel and magazine to load the rifle.

Last edited by Katkt; 04-05-2009 at 14:26.
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Old 04-12-2009, 18:48   #2
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Katkt,
Sounds like you picked up a 1866 Yellowboy.


instead of a Henry.


The weird part, you have described how a Henry loads; however, I have never seen an original or reproduction with a wooden fore end.
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Old 04-14-2009, 02:50   #3
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www.taylorsfirearms.com
These folks have a Win.66 Transition Rifle that has the slide on forearm but it uses a loading gate. I didn't see where it is offered with a CCH frame.
If you have questions, try contacting them. They're good folks to talk to and deal alot of Uberti rifles.
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Old 04-14-2009, 10:33   #4
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Just purchased a 22 magnum Henry Golden Boy for my wife...it has a wood fore end
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Old 04-14-2009, 12:38   #5
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The 1860 Henry came onto the scene chambered in .41 caliber rimfire. The original Henrys looked like the sample above. To load, you pulled up on the follower (tab hanging down in front of receiver) rotated the barrel aside and loaded fourteen rounds. "Load on Sunday and shoot all week".
The "transistion" rifle, in original form is rare.
The 1866 was made with a loading gate and a wooden fore end.
The 1873 added sideplates that allowed easier access to the internals.
All three rifles have a toggle action. It works the same (somewhat) way as a Luger, except the toggles hang down.
While the Uberti repros are pricey, they will handle all cartridges with much more ease that a 94, 92, marlin, or the new Henry. Now before you pop, the 94 and 92 were made for bottleneck rifle cartridges. They have difficulty handling/chambering pistol rounds. The 94 and 92 are much stronger rifles. The 1866 and the 1873 was not made for high power rifle rounds. They were chambered in 38-40, 44-40, 32-20. The 45 Colt was never chambered in the 1873 (originals), to my knowledge.

The transistion rifle is very rare. I have never seen an actual rifle.

The new Henry Golden Boy is a strong rifle but has noting in common with the original or repro'd Henrys. Matter of fact the design of the new Henry is unique
. It does not look like any other lever rifle. The Henry Corporation struggled for a couple of years to get SASS to accept the rifle as a "match gun".

you might disagree, but the 1873 can be made to function like no 92 or 94 ever would hope to. My 1873s feel like I have removed all springs and polished all resistance away.
These are mine.Marlin 38-55 on left.


However; the 1866 and 1873 cannot handle much more than a factory 44Mag or 45 Colt.

Last edited by Red Cent; 04-14-2009 at 12:51.
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Old 04-14-2009, 13:30   #6
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I understand that they are totally different rifles...comparing NEW from Old/Repro...no matter wife loves her "Henry"
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Old 04-14-2009, 17:19   #7
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The Henry is used a lot by cowboys in the 22 side matches. The 22 cycles very well and is very accurate. I have a Henry. The blued and plastic version. I have slicked it up and worked on the trigger. Very smooth and fast. I like it a lot.
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Old 04-22-2009, 10:54   #8
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I've been outta town.

I was surprised by the wood fore end also. The rifle I saw, was an Uberti clone. I'd never seen an early Henry(or a clone of one)before, and when I noticed what looked like a piece added to the barrel, and asked the guy behind the counter he was a clueless as I was. When I made the original post, I went wandering on the net and answered the question regarding the loading feature.

This rifle ejected the spent cartridge out of the top of the reciever, and could only be loaded via the muzzle end of the rifle. There was no loading gate on the reciever.


I was surprised, because I didn't realize how hefty the originals design was. This thing weighed about 10 pounds. I could see a cowboys horse running off after toting this thing for a day.
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Old 04-24-2009, 07:19   #9
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Red Cent,

I'm going to have to make a return trip to the store to see what I think I saw.
Your pics of the 1866, and the comments about the transiton rifle from Taylor posted by Copen, has my curiosity arroused. I'm starting to feel cross-eyed.

The Taylor transition has a forestock , but its attached further out. The forestock on this rifle was attached in the more conventional manner.

The forestock on a Henry would be a non starter. The follower couldn't travel all the way back to the reciever, and retrieving the tab on the follower would be impossible once it disappeared.

Whats worse, is that I'm thinking about swinging by the bank on the way to the store. I'd of been alright, if you hadn't posted the pics of your long gun collection. Such a severe imbalance needs to be remedied.
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Old 04-24-2009, 12:03   #10
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The transition rifle did not have a follower. The rifle was manufactured with a loading gate and loaded like '66, '73. Don't know why they placed the fore end so far out.
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Old 04-24-2009, 17:12   #11
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Well, I've helped the economy.

Whatever I thought I saw, wasn't there. It may have been a fiction of my imagination. There was an Uberti Henry(1860) with the case hardened receiver and no fore stock(a very attractive rifle), where the rifle I thought I saw was. I retracted the follower, and rotated the end of the barrel, just to say I did, and almost bought it.
But!!!!!!!, they had a ....they called it a demo(I'd call it slightly used)......Uberti 1866 clone....model 66 sporting rifle, with an engraved reciever, that followed me home. The furniture is beautiful. I probably paid more then I should have, but I've been thru a divorce, so I have experience with that sort of thing.

For its time, the original Henry was truely a phenomenal rifle. It was fun to see the replicas first hand. Maybe in the future, I might buy one. The follower and rotating barrel end was a stroke of genius.
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Old 04-24-2009, 18:07   #12
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One of the top three cowboy rifles.
Now you need an action job, replace the lever spring and the elevator spring (flat bar) with Whisper Springs. Replace the brass elevator with a gold anodized alloy elevator, and order a short stroke kit. Then have the gunsmith to make the two piece trigger into a one piece trigger (too much slop for Cowboy shooting). Remove the lever safety and install a trigger stop in its place.

Action job $200.00
Whisper Springs 40.00
elevator 80.00
Short stroke kit 225.00
Trigger 50.00
Trigger stop 50.00

Then you need to get a backup in case your match gun goes down. When you travel 300 miles or so for a three day shoot, it is difficult to run down to the local gun store and find another that works like your match gun.

I'm kidding, I'm kidding. (I have three of 'em)
If you attempt to take it apart be forewarned they have a 800 pound Gorilla that does nothing but tighten screws at the Uberti (Beretta) factory. And, the screws are not very hard. Get a very good hollow ground screwdriver that fits those screws in your sideplates.

Engraved huh? That what cowboys call style points.

Very good choice of rifles. What caliber?
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Old 04-24-2009, 19:14   #13
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.45 long colt. The engraving tipped the scales. I almost walked out with the 1860 Henry.

Last edited by Katkt; 04-24-2009 at 19:17.
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