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Old 12-14-2016, 20:10   #1
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You know you are old when.....

I remember when tv stations went off the air. I forget what the time was. No tv from 12:00-1:00 til around 5 or 6.
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Old 12-15-2016, 01:00   #2
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you know you're getting old when jeff Foxworthy seems blasť.
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Old 12-15-2016, 03:42   #3
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I thought growing old would take a lot longer.
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Old 12-15-2016, 07:07   #4
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Originally Posted by 2glock3 View Post
I remember when tv stations went off the air. I forget what the time was. No tv from 12:00-1:00 til around 5 or 6.
With test patterns and playing the national anthem when shutting down and starting up. And rabbit ears with aluminum foil attached for better reception. And a channel knob.

We didn't get a color TV until I was in college. 1972.
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Old 12-15-2016, 08:44   #5
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I was just writing the same thing.

They would play the National Anthem before signing off and you'd get just snow or one of these test patterns.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NS9uojwaN7E
...often accompanied with an irritating tone. I guess that was intended to wake a person up so they would get up and turn off the TV. Of coarse that was years before cable and satellite TV.

I remember when sponsors used to announce, "This program brought to you in living color." To let viewers know they were missing out if a B&W TV was all they had.

What got to me recently was....

....Lorraine McFly (Lea Thompson) cast as the grandmother of a ten year old on the TV series "Scorpion".

....a 60 year old Marcia Brady seen on Dancing With The Stars.

....And Liesl Von Trapp (Charmian Carr) the oldest daughter in the Sound of Music who died in September of old age at 73.
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Old 12-15-2016, 08:53   #6
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"Well you know, that you're over the hill, When you mind makes a promise that your body can't fill..." Little Feet

I grew up in the middle of nowhere, and there was no TV until about 1968, and then only one channel in black and white. In the 70's we put up a rotor and new antenna and we could get all three major networks, and had graduated to color as well.

I went to school in a one room schoolhouse, K-12 with one teacher in the early 60's. It was heated by a coal stove in the corner. The older high school aged kids helped with the younger ones; that system of rural township schools lasted until 1968 when school buses made their debut in the area. Unfortunately I spent an hour and a half every morning and two hours every night on the damned bus, but it was a small price to pay for growing up in the middle of nowhere.

I had friends back in those days who grew up without indoor plumbing. There was a hand pump on their kitchen sink and an outhouse just outside the back door. I had other cousins who used a team of workhorses to plow, plant, and harvest. These were the mid-60's mind you, but we were still a little behind the times where I grew up.

About 1969 or '70 my grandfather told me two things; he said take all of the math you can and get into electronics, because one day everything is going to have a computer chip in it. It was the only advice I ever followed from an adult, but it was also the best.

There were no neighbors, the closest kids lived a few miles away, so I had to learn to entertain myself. When I grew up there were no cell phones, no CD's, no Videos, and no video games, that is until Pong came out. Having only one (and later three) network channels didn't provide much entertainment for a young adventurer, so I spent my days in the woods behind our house. I could go for miles in just about any direction and not come across any civilization save a few forest trails. I built my forts, expanded my realm, and traversed the great unexplored territory that was waiting for me in the back yard.

It was a different time then, I miss it terribly. Things were far more simple back then, and though the political strife that besets us today was there even back then I was far removed from it, unlike today.

Don't look back, you can never look back; the way to the future is forward I keep telling myself.

Sure miss the past though.
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Old 12-15-2016, 09:24   #7
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Those Were The Days ...

No zip codes yet. Just a zone number for the mail. Ours was zone 8. Daily lime green bread truck. Donuts were a nickel. Could not afford one.

During the summer, (slightly warmer) we had the every day ice cream truck. I still remember the jingle tune. Could not afford ice cream either.

A 16 ounce Bubble Up cost a nickel. The deposit was two cents. A big candy bar was also 5 cents. Regular leaded gasoline cost $0.19 cents a gallon.

I bought my first car for $100 bucks at age 16. A lot of money. A 1955 Buick Roadmaster V8. Slowly went through it rebuilding her. Wish I had it today.

Distinctly remember the 1961 Cuban Missile Crisis. Fear is a good word. Watching folks panic remains in my memory. Also remember Kennedy.

But ... us old folks need to remind ourselves we are not quite done yet. We are not getting older ... we are getting better. Pain is weakness leaving.
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Old 12-15-2016, 10:09   #8
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32 cents-a-gallon gas (or less). Change back from your $10 for a fill-up. And the service attendant checked your oil and cleaned your windshield.

Esso stations (still have them in Europe).

Black table top dial phones or ugly "harvest gold" wall phone in the kitchen; only phone in the house. And "party lines".

One-car family.

Everything you bought, you paid for with cash or check. If you didn't have the money, you didn't buy it.

TWA and Pan Am.

Slide rules.

Steam engines were the norm for everything except passenger trains.

Interstates didn't have pot holes, because they were new.

"Air conditioning" was opening the windows and, perhaps, a fan.

Electrical outlets only had two prongs.

There was only AM radio - when you could get it.

Monkey Wards, Kresge, Woolworth's, Five-and-Dime, Lafayette Radio and Heathkit, Allied Radio, Hechinger's Lumber, Burger Chef, Hot Shoppes and HOJO's restaurants. I loved the HOJO's fried clam rolls.

Chain gangs and rule of law. Western Union telegrams (closest thing to e-mail). 4 cents for a first class letter, 3 cents for a postcard.

Radio Shack TRS-80, Model One, Level II - cassette tape drive for backup and loading programs you wrote yourself, in BASIC. (still have mine). 16K of RAM and "all you'll ever need". CP/M operating system and WordStar on an Osborne-I computer (also still have) - 64K of RAM and "all you'll ever need". 8" floppy drives (still used these in HQDA ODCSOPS through 1997 for "vux"ing each day).

Starched cotton fatigues with white T-shirts. Starched khakis. MARS services (you'll only get this if you were in the military).

Buddy Holly. Bias-ply tires. A REAL spare tire. Crank windows.

45 RPM records. And record players.

Meals with silverware on flights, including a hot towel prior to landing.

More to follow.
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Old 12-16-2016, 18:43   #9
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8 track was phasing out going to cassette. I remember the 8 track conversion piece you put your cassette in. My dad had reel to reel for music.

One big one you don't dare do anymore. I was walking home from 1st grade by myself.

No video games or anything like that. We entertained ourselves, outside. Made up games. My mom couldn't get me in the house. I was outside all the time. Catching snakes and bringing them home. This was in Montana.

My how things have changed.
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Old 12-17-2016, 00:47   #10
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broke my wrist falling off an out-house I was watching a baseball game from the top of

just after desegregation an old Black man used to bring the kids from his part of town to school in a mule drawn wagon

bought my ammo at the corner butcher market

Dad bought handguns at the local hardware store w/o even a register recipt

I WAS our TV antenna rotor......3 channels unless it was raining

going to Kroger to buy tubes to fix the radio and TV

no air conditioning, but Mom got a front page write up for being the 1st lady in town to own a microwave oven.......no one else trusted them at this point

hitch hiking across town to hunt, with a rifle in my hand, and never failing to catch a ride (usually with a Senior Citizen)

being awestruck by the stories of the WW1 Vets my Nanny let me sit with at her 2x weekly Senior Citizens meeting uptown.......and wondering why none of them talked to the ancient, wheelchair bound man that never spoke, but used to slip me coffee candies.
They would whisper about how mean he was because he'd been a "Rough Rider".
he's buried uptown with the other old warriors .......
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Old 12-17-2016, 03:44   #11
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Friday night fights, Saturday evening wrestling. Dixie dogs (chili/slaw) for a dime at the legion post on the 4th. memorial day and veteran's day parades. "I like Ike".
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:14   #12
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Originally Posted by 2glock3 View Post
8 track was phasing out going to cassette. I remember the 8 track conversion piece you put your cassette in. My dad had reel to reel for music.

One big one you don't dare do anymore. I was walking home from 1st grade by myself.

No video games or anything like that. We entertained ourselves, outside. Made up games. My mom couldn't get me in the house. I was outside all the time. Catching snakes and bringing them home. This was in Montana.

My how things have changed.
2glock, I must admit, I am a pack-rat. Still have my Teac 10" reel-to-reel, 7" reel-to-reel, and a Sony 7" reel-to-reel I bought in the '60s (bought the 10" in Germany in 1980). Will set up the two Teacs when I get the 2nd floor of my man-cave finished. They produced some wonderful sounds through my Sansui tube receiver. Still have about a dozen un-opened 10" reels hermetically sealed. Hope they're still good.

The fine folks we bought this farm from left behind a tube-powered Pioneer 8-track recorder! I guess it was a last gasp to keep 8-tracks relevant; didn't work.

I remember when 8-tracks first came out and I bought a player. Still have it somewhere. No tapes left, of course. Unless they are in a box in my basement under the boxes and boxes of 5.25" floppy disks...
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:21   #13
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Almost forgot...a 48-star flag. Interestingly, I have a very nice 49-star flag I rescued from a Pentagon dumpster back in 1998.
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Old 12-17-2016, 10:28   #14
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You're old when:

Your dreams are dry, and

Your farts are wet
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Old 12-17-2016, 11:46   #15
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An older friend (now deceased) said of old age:
1) "Never trust a fart."
2) "Never pass up the opportunity to pee."
and:
3) "Never pass up the opportunity to have sex - even if you're alone."

I miss the guy.
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Old 12-17-2016, 11:57   #16
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More Old Stuff ...

Daily school flag raising at 8 am with bugles. We stood at our desks. Then recited the Pledge Of Allegiance To The Flag while standing. Monarch .22rf ammo was .39 cents a box of 50 at Doolies Hardware store and we thought that was outrageous.

Seems ALL of us owned Nylon 66 rifles.

No automotive smog laws in Los Angeles County. Then I had to buy my first automotive crankcase smog valve for my 1955 Buick Roadmaster and I thought THAT expense was outrageous. About 20 bucks for a 10 cent part. Installed it myself properly.

More later when I think about it.

PS. Thought about it. Bought a BIG Christmas Tree one year for one dollar of my own money. About 12. Mowed yards for a quarter. I was so proud of myself. Can still remember carrying it home by myself. That was a good Christmas for all.
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Old 12-17-2016, 13:02   #17
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everything gets bigger, hairier and closer to the ground.
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Old 12-20-2016, 14:30   #18
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Originally Posted by rhevans View Post
You're old when:

Your dreams are dry, and

Your farts are wet

That's way too true to be funny!!!
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Old 12-20-2016, 14:40   #19
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Yeah, and the little woman ain't as little as she once was.
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Old 12-20-2016, 15:01   #20
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Originally Posted by RJF View Post
With test patterns and playing the national anthem when shutting down and starting up. And rabbit ears with aluminum foil attached for better reception. And a channel knob.

We didn't get a color TV until I was in college. 1972.
And remember how much fun "tube testers" were?
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Old 12-20-2016, 15:03   #21
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Originally Posted by HB of CJ View Post
Daily school flag raising at 8 am with bugles. We stood at our desks. Then recited the Pledge Of Allegiance To The Flag while standing. Monarch .22rf ammo was .39 cents a box of 50 at Doolies Hardware store and we thought that was outrageous.

Seems ALL of us owned Nylon 66 rifles.

No automotive smog laws in Los Angeles County. Then I had to buy my first automotive crankcase smog valve for my 1955 Buick Roadmaster and I thought THAT expense was outrageous. About 20 bucks for a 10 cent part. Installed it myself properly.

More later when I think about it.

PS. Thought about it. Bought a BIG Christmas Tree one year for one dollar of my own money. About 12. Mowed yards for a quarter. I was so proud of myself. Can still remember carrying it home by myself. That was a good Christmas for all.
And I would by .22 longs rather than long rifle to save a 5 cents a box.
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Old 12-20-2016, 15:50   #22
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AM-only radio in a car - when it was available! Didn't have a radio in a car until 1970, when my Dad inherited his father's 1969 Ford Galaxy XL two door. It was loaded and the first time we ever experienced AC, AM/FM, power anything, a V-8 (351) and an automatic transmission. And a clock! The hood was long enough to land an A-6 Intruder on.

Not the first car I drove (1954 Plymouth Station Wagon), but was a fine cruiser!
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Old 12-20-2016, 18:56   #23
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Picking lilacs (upstate NY-lilacs were the only flowers out then) to put on the veteran's graves on Decoration Day. Going to the fire station with my Dad, dressed in his real Army uniform, to watch him and the other veterans get the '03's that were sent from the Armory. Riding our bikes decorated with red, white and blue crepe paper in the spokes and carrying the lilacs. We were behind our Dads who were dressed in their WWII uniforms and the sound of the cadence being called by real soldiers. The reverence of the parade watchers when the color guard and the veterans went by. The shiny dime the cemetery superintendent would give to each kid as they left the cemetery after placing the flowers on the flag marked graves. The way the earth shook when the salute was fired (girls covered their ears, the boys wouldn't think of it) because we boys were standing as close to the soldiers as possible and how after the third volley the boys would rush for the brass only to be stopped in their tracks by the soldier who COMMANDED us to stop and be careful because the brass would be hot and to have a soldier check the shell to be sure it wasn't live. The wonderful smell of the burnt powder and the sound of whistling when we blew across the brass. Following the soldiers as they marched back to the fire station, going into the cool dark fire station meeting room to buy a Coke with the dime we got from the cemetery superintendent, from the vending machine with the coldest soda I ever had. Hanging around while the soldiers had a beer then going home with Dad and then off to a picnic. When in the presence of the veterans, even a child could feel the importance of that day and the importance of the parade and recognition of the veterans.
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Old 12-22-2016, 14:45   #24
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Sorry to say it but most of you guys sound "young" to me. All you mentioned and more bring fond memories, including my favorite radio mystery programs (AM). When we finally got TV I believe it went off the air at Midnight with the national anthem and came back about 7 am in our part of the country (Rocky Mtns) Now we have BS, 24/7, 365 and little or nothing to watch. IMHO of course

ps: bought my first gun at a local grocery store and my second through the mail. Ammo was in every gas station and grocery store.
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Old 12-22-2016, 16:25   #25
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More Old Stuff ...

The neighborhood bean shooter wars. About 1958. We used Jolly Time Yellow Pop Corn because we thugged it from MOM'S kitchen shelf ... and thus it was "free". Lots and lots of volunteer corn plants throughout the neighborhood.

But ... there were Sunday nights when we watched brand new Bonanza on our tiny 12" black and white TV when we had no popcorn to pop ... seems we shot it all off getting even then destroying the neighboring block "gang".

Speaking of the TV western show "Bonanza", later around 1963 around October, Bonanza would run an entire episode commercial free so Chevy could introduce the new model cars. We waited months for that special.

New cars were boss. Remember the slot car craze? Oh how we spent our lawn moving money on Pitmann and Cox slot car motors and tube brass and learning how to braze up our custom slot car chassis. Much fun.

Skate Boards. We made up our own using one inch thugged plywood and "borrowed" steel clamp on skates. Common 8 penny nails bent over. Mine had the front orange rubber limiters removed for more aggressive steering.

Anybody else remember this stuff? Los Angeles suburb boy growing up in the golden age of California. We lived about 8 miles from the ocean. Biked down to tin can beach. Learned to surf at about age 12. A California thing.
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